Sunday, August 22, 2010

The Gardens of Glenveagh

Nice article in the Irish Times about Glenveagh:

http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/magazine/2010/0821/1224276997698.html

... I’ve written before about Elizabeth Temple’s magical walled garden at Salthill, just outside Mountcharles, so won’t again, except to say it is even better than when I saw it last four years ago. And I’ve no room to do justice to the carefully and beautifully restored Oakfield Park, near Raphoe, the home of Gerry and Heather Robinson, so I’ll save that for another time – although let me just mention that if you fancy visiting, you’ll need to hightail it up there before the end of the month, when the season closes for the year.
Glenveagh
Glenveagh Lough by Mick Timony
So instead, I’d like to park myself for the rest of this page at Glenveagh Castle Gardens . This is one of the most remarkable gardens on this island. It is concealed in a remote and seemingly inhospitable place, in the middle of Glenveagh National Park in the north of the county ... The setting of the gardens is spectacular, but so also is the planting. Within the sheltered microclimate, frost is rare (last winter was an exception), rainfall is high, and growth is lush. Big-leaved rhododendrons, elegantly-fronded tree ferns, and plump Cordyline indivisa make this a surreal, subtropical oasis in the hostile mountain landscape. Much of the planting dates back to the 1950s, 60s and 70s when the last private owner, Henry McIlhenny, employed – among others – British plantsman and designer James Russell of Sunningdale Nursery, and later, American garden designer Lanning Roper.

... The setting of the gardens is spectacular, but so also is the planting. Within the sheltered microclimate, frost is rare (last winter was an exception), rainfall is high, and growth is lush. Big-leaved rhododendrons, elegantly-fronded tree ferns, and plump Cordyline indivisa make this a surreal, subtropical oasis in the hostile mountain landscape. Much of the planting dates back to the 1950s, 60s and 70s when the last private owner, Henry McIlhenny, employed – among others – British plantsman and designer James Russell of Sunningdale Nursery, and later, American garden designer Lanning Roper.

I was hoping to stop at Oakfield when I'm home in the 1st week of September, but they close for the season on August 31st! Bahh! Oh well, I guess I'll take the opportunity to go to Glenveagh, walk the lough and better explore the gardens. Anyone been to Temple's gardens?

3 comments:

Mick T. said...

If you want to go to Oakfield, go this week. The gardens close for the season on August 31st!

Maria said...

Was at Oakfield in August this year myself, and it really is worth the visit! It's beautiful. Was at glenveagh last year, and Oakfield is a great rival. The train that meanders throughout the park is fantastic also and worth a ride.

Mick T. said...

Thanks for the feedback Maria, maybe next year I'll be home while Oakfield is open.

Thanks!
Mick