Saturday, April 18, 2009

News

Time for a cute news story! The Gweedore Court Hotel is doing great, with business up 20%! So how'd they do it? They have a wee buffalo herd!
http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/travel/2009/0411/1224244396430.html
... Hotel owner Patrick Doherty won his first two animals at a charity auction in 2006. Since then, nature has taken its course and the herd now extends to nine, with the latest addition to the family making its appearance last summer.

“They have settled in really well and proven enormously popular with visitors,” said Doherty, who built a look-out tower on to the hotel so guests can enjoy watching them in all weather.

“I never had any plans to get into rearing buffalo but I have to say they make a lovely hobby,” said Doherty. “They are magnificent-looking creatures that are a joy to watch and people come from far and wide to see them, not just residents in the hotel.”

But don’t be deceived by their docile appearance. “It’s a mistake to think they are like cows. In fact they can be quite temperamental and if they decide to go for you, watch out, because they can get up to speeds of 40mph,” he says.“We’ve got great publicity as a result of them, to the point that this year is looking good for us too.”

Donegal fishermen heading to Pacific, they claim it's because they can't fish locally because of EU rules. I say it's partly because our waters are probably overfished. I hope Irish fishermen aren't going to do to others what the Spanish did to us years ago and going to go overfish other people's waters:
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/ireland/article6078482.ece
Howley and three others have applied for fishing licences from the South Pacific Regional Fisheries Management Organisation (SPFO). Since 2006 it has regulated fishing in the international waters south of the Equator and west of South America. If successful, it will be the first time Irish fishing trawlers without factory equipment have made the month-long trip. The Irish-registered Atlantic Dawn, which fished in the area in 2006, is a so-called supertrawler with its own freezing equipment and storage. Howley plans to cast nets around 200 miles west of the Chilean and Peruvian border but said they could go as far west as New Zealand ...

Howley said a trip to the South Pacific is worthwhile because he estimates that reductions in quotas have cut the days his vessel works from 300 days a year in the mid-1990s to 80 this year.

“Some of the men here have had to work on oil projects doing security, or on supply ships, but others are on social welfare,” he said. “It’s a long journey through the Panama Canal and down the coast of Chile. We would probably sail with half a crew and change crews when we get there. If we are to survive we have to go out and fight for it.”


Coming Home Western Viking
Thanks to dingbat on Flickr for this pic of Killybegs.

After the death of Garda McCallion who was based in Letterkenny, the Irish Times has an interesting editorial about the increase of violence in our society, the increasing use of guns, knifes, and the unruliness of increasingly drunk or drugged people:
http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/weekend/2009/0411/1224244433528.html
When the teenagers inside saw Garda McCallion approach, they tried to reverse at speed in an effort to escape. They pinned the 29-year-old from Swinford, Co Mayo, against a brick wall. He sustained head injuries and was rushed to hospital. He never regained consciousness.

His life-support machine was switched off on Monday. The following day he died at Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, surrounded by members of his family.

GardaĆ­ are being called upon to police an increasingly violent society. But what has shocked his colleagues across the force is the manner in which the seemingly minor Garda operation in Letterkenny escalated in seconds into a serious incident.

1 comment:

Mick T. said...

About the overfishing; I might have been a bit over-zealous in blaming the fishermen, or at least Irish and Donegal fishermen for over-fishing. I came across and article (if I can find it again I'll post it) that talks about how non-Irish fleets were held to less strict regulations compared to Irish fishermen and they are mainly to blame for the over-fishing off the Irish coasts. (Rem 20 or more years the Spanish & Russian fishing fleets had huge boats compared to the Irish fishing fleets and they scooped up everything).