Wednesday, February 25, 2009

News

Regional airports with less than 50,000 passengers per year will be exempt from travel tax, this includes Donegal Airport up in Carrickfinn, and Sligo Airport:
http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/breaking/2009/0225/breaking66.html
Making the announcement Mr Lenihan said concerns had been raised regarding the impact the air travel tax could have on small peripheral airports and their ability to develop new routes. “Having further considered the matter I have decided that flights departing from the smaller airports, which under the existing legislation would be subject to the air travel tax, should be excluded from the air travel tax,” he said.
Hopefully this is good news for our 2 regional airports. BTW, has anyone ever flown into Carrickfinn or Sligo?

And a nice article about rural GP's that includes Aranmore's doctor, Dr. Kevin Quinn:
http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/magazine/2009/0221/1224241513360.html
“I had always wanted to be a career GP but I never really envisaged the rural life. I always sort of assumed I would end up working as part of a team of doctors. I wonder sometimes, will I stay here forever? Is there another career in me?” The people of Árainn Mhór, he says, didn’t really care that he was so young when he arrived first.

And there's an assistance coach course being held in Stranorlar starting Wednesday March the 4th. See the link for full details & prices, and Donegal Town's Eamon Harvey is the contact person.
http://www.athleticsireland.ie/content/?p=5784
Athletics Ireland is pleased to announce that an Assistant Coaches course will be held in the Finn Valley Centre, Stranorlar, Co Donegal on Wednesday evenings the 4th and 11th March.

The aim of the assistant coach course is to give some basic skills to the beginner coach to help assist a more senior coach in the delivery of coaching sessions to young Athletes. It is an introduction to the coaching of three key events, running (Sprints and Endurance), Jumping (Long Jump) and Throwing (Shot Putt).

Donegal County Council will get to keep any holiday home tax it raises. This could over 3 million Euro, but that's also assuming that all those holiday home owners can afford to cough up the tax.
http://www.highlandradio.com/news.php?articleid=000003593
The County Manager expects that 3.6 million will be raised from the holiday home tax and if that is more than Donegal's share of the local government fund the county will keep the difference.

A 200 euro levy is to be imposed on holiday homes and non principle residencies however there was concern that money raised would be administered by central government with Donegal not getting its fair share.

And then the times has an article about the pros & cons of holidaying in Ireland or abroad:
http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/travel/2009/0221/1224241556536.html
IT WAS A €17.95 pizza in a restaurant in Sligo that made us revisit our summer-holiday plans. Sure, it was billed as a deluxe vegetarian pizza, but the best part of €20 for a fairly basic option in a very, very ordinary pizza parlour is steep. When it’s a family and you multiply that by four, then add a couple of glasses of wine and some soft drinks, you’re talking well over €100 for a bit of tea – and don’t even think about having that side salad, dessert or second Coke. On our weekend in the west it was painfully easy to spend more than €50 at lunchtime. Suddenly our plans to spend our summer holidays at home looked like a horribly expensive option.

We’ve had fantastic holidays in Ireland, and if we could be guaranteed sun we’d almost certainly prefer to splash around the magnificent beaches at Cruit Island, in Co Donegal, or Derrynane, in Co Kerry, rather than some of the overcrowded high-rise-surrounded stretches of sand we’ve fetched up on abroad.

But even when the sun is shining you can’t eat the scenery, and it’s everything that goes with an Irish holiday that can really add up. In Italy last year a pizza in what became our favourite holiday haunt, with views of the bay every balmy evening, was €7.95, or €4 if you wanted to take it away. And in Spain this month we could eat a three-course meal for €20 each – so no glowering at the children if they wanted dessert.

Ireland has gotten wile dear, the only good side of this recession is that it might bring prices down a bit, but sure no-one can afford anything anyway if they don't have a job.

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